Why Become a Mason

There are many reasons, for participating in Freemasonry. The fraternity is not for everyone. The rewards of participation vary based on what the individual man seeks based on his understanding of Freemasonry from the outside.

Some of the benefits of Freemasonry are obvious, some are less tangible. I joined Freemasonry, because men I respected were Masons. I knew about some famous people, including presidents, athletes, astronauts, and film stars, who were Masons.

There is a monetary cost to become and maintain membership, but it is not excessive. While historically dues had not kept up with inflation, many lodges have begun to correct that problem.

Tejon Lodge charges $300 to receive the degrees of Freemasonry and $125 per year to continue membership once a man has become a Master Mason.

The frequency of meetings varies, depending on the location of the man. Tejon Lodge has a Stated Communication (or business meeting) once a month except July and August, and 12 Special Communications (or degree/educational meetings) one per month.

We keep the business meeting succinct and focused, while special meetings are focused on the degree or education being presented. We also have social events that completely outside the lodge experience with family and friends to just have fun and get to know our brothers outside of being just brothers.

One of the greatest benefits of becoming a freemason is the simple rule –

When you are a Mason anywhere, you are a Mason everywhere.

Once you have become a Master Mason you have the privilege to visit other lodges nationwide, and internationally.

Freemasonry does indeed offer opportunities for personal growth, and self-improvement. Lodge education presents the esoteric and philosophical lessons from more than past 3 millennium.

Yes, you can “network”, and meet men from many different backgrounds and educations, but that is not a reason to join, just a pleasant benefit of membership.

Freemasonry is a place where men, regardless of wealth or influence, can meet “on the level”.

I cannot stress enough, that Freemasonry is not a charitable or service organization. While some Masonically-affiliated groups disburse about $2.6 million dollars per day, in charitable and humanitarian causes, this money is from centuries of investments to these groups and not a part of the Masonic Lodge which is the foundation of regular Freemasonry.

Any man can derive many benefits from participation in the Ancient and Gentle Craft – Friendship, Morality, and Brotherly Love are hallmarks of the institution and the basis on how we build our personal relationships and how we share our interpretation of the ancient mysteries of the craft.